UT Faculty Research

This collection features articles, conference proceedings, professional posters, research data, and other contributions by University of Toledo faculty.

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Atmospheric Refraction
Atmospheric Refraction
The Runge-Kutta FORTRAN programming and the computer graphics were done on an IBM 7094 computer and a CalComp plotter by Keith Stroyan for Junior Stein in August, 1967, in the Operations Research Group (ORG) headed by Dr. William Simpson, U.S. Naval Missile Center, Point Mugu, California . In summer, 1967, Keith Stroyan and Junior Stein shared an office at ORG . In fall, 1967, Keith Stroyan started graduate school in mathematics with a fellowship at Caltech., although his undergraduate degree was in physics. Junior Stein was a Ph.D. student in mathematics at UCLA. Any mistakes in the report are those of Junior Stein and not Keith Stroyan. Junior Stein is Ivie Stein Jr.
Conjugate Direction Algorithms In Numerical Analysis And Optimization
Conjugate Direction Algorithms In Numerical Analysis And Optimization
The purpose of this paper is to present some effective optimization techniques in numerical analysis. A mathematical development and a geometric interpretation of the conjugate direction method are presented. The.method is used to minimize a real valued function of n real variables. Included are numerical computations for a variety of test functions. The results are compared computationally with other methods used in minimization. Also, listings of computer programs are included., National Science Foundation, Washington, D.C. 20550, Grant no. GP-40175, August 1, 1973 - Jan. 31, 1975; Faculty Research Grant, The University of Toledo, January, 1974 - June, 1975.
Diving for cover: The economics of the modern subduction of American peripatetic...
Diving for cover: The economics of the modern subduction of American peripatetic...
Merchants have continually exploited the economic concept of uninformed demand and information asymmetry to maximize earnings, meaning selling lower quality goods and services at higher-than-market prices because the product is perceived by uninformed customers as of higher-than-actual quality. Peripatetic peoples, ethnically-recruited, kin-based spatially-mobile service providers, (a.k.a. "service nomads") also take advantage of this market failure by soliciting households, businesses, and individuals to purchase discount services, which are frequently of lower quality than advertised and that of sedentary providers. These underground service nomads create and exploit uninformed demand markets through a combination of costsaving methods, a wide range of practiced story-telling strategies, and competitive advantage arising from impulsive demand created by conveniently meeting demand points individually where they exist. This strategy has proved remarkably successful, for service nomads have been able to earn substantial profits selling home repair and auto body repair services in the United States for decades. This study tests whether and how closely service nomads follow the principles of uninformed demand by measuring the effect of individual information asymmetry on per-transaction earnings, as well as and the attraction of locations' demographic characteristics related to uninformed demand markets on the quantity of provided peripatetic home repair services using detailed police reports on underground service nomad-related crimes collected by law enforcement agents specializing in what is known in their discourse as bunco or "transient" crimes. Space plays a dynamic and essential role in organized informal economic activity; therefore, these economies deserve more attention from researchers, especially economic geographers.
Gypsy Territoriality and the Ofisa Shell Game
Gypsy Territoriality and the Ofisa Shell Game
Romanies have sustained their remarkably successful underground existence depending on specialty trades in territorial niche markets. The Rom, an ethnic Romani sub-group, rely on fortune-telling as their major source of income. Fortune-telling “offices,” translated from ofisas in the Romani language (Rromanes), are the center of urban market areas, with entire towns being sold as fortune-telling territories. Many Rom sell ofisas via internet message boards and streaming video websites, exposing valuable information on desirable location attributes, territorial disputes, as well as the (self) appraised value of their territories. By mining these posts, one of the co-authors was able to compile a large georeferenced dataset on ofisa prices and characteristics, which offered initial insights into measureable attributes impacting ofisa prices. These empirical results when mapped inspired the creation of a crude ofisa location prediction model. Our poster presentation graphically highlights findings from the data gathering process, including ofisa design, terminology, and territorial disputes. In general, the data-dredging process from Internet sources reveals previously unknown details about Rom communication, territoriality, and ofisa location selection.
Information Literacy Instruction Assignment In an Online Module
Information Literacy Instruction Assignment In an Online Module
"One problem with trying to introduce information literacy skills to engineering students is that some faculty are reluctant to change their courses to include this new material. Other faculty have difficulty developing an assignment that will require students to learn and use information literacy skills. Having had success with a freshman orientation class, a librarian and instructional designer collaborated to transform that assignment into an online module. The module was created in Blackboard and was designed to be generic enough so that it can easily be modified for any course. The assignment asks students to work in teams on a design project. The specific design project can be determined by the course instructor, making the module customizable to any engineering discipline. Students are told that early in the design process working engineers need to gather and analyze information from a variety of sources. Students will submit a report outlining their research process along with a bibliography of the sources they used. These reports will be evaluated on the clarity of the writing, the variety and appropriateness of sources cited, as well as the accuracy of the citations. This module teaches information literacy skills while also showing how those skills are part of the engineering design process. This paper will describe the process by which this module was developed, how this module can be integrated into courses, and how this module teaches information literacy while also showing how those skills are part of the engineering design process.", Previously published in: Proceedings of the American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exhibition, 2013
Introduction to Quadratic Form Theory and Index Theory of Quadratic Forms with...
Introduction to Quadratic Form Theory and Index Theory of Quadratic Forms with...
These are the initial notes that were typed for Magnus R. Hestenes by Thelma Harvey in the Mathematics Department at UCLA. They were used for Mathematics 285G, Seminar in Analysis, Winter and Spring Quarters, 1967. What is presented here includes some minor corrections and editorial remarks describing how some of this theory was developed and later changed. Quadratic Form Theory and Differential Equations by John Gregory, Academic Press, 1980, is a comprehensive treatment of this subject with Chapter Two, Abstract Theory, of special interest. Applications of the theory of quadratic forms in Hilbert space in the calculus of variations by Magnus R. Hestenes, Pacific Journal of Mathematics, volume 1, pp. 525-582 (1951), forms a basis for this subject and was a development which extended the ideas of Marston Morse, George D. Birkhoff, and Henri Poincare. The subject matter presented here is algebraic in nature and includes an infinite dimensional local Morse Theory. Some of the indices include signature or negative index, nullity, and relative nullity. The idea of a Q-closed subspace is defined by two conditions at the beginning of section 9 of these notes and later changed to one condition by Magnus R. Hestenes as described in John Gregory's book by equation (12), page 65. Also, the term manifold in both Hestenes' notes and Gregory's book means linear subspace.
Point of Care Products in Health Science Classes
Point of Care Products in Health Science Classes
Point of Care products (POCs) provide health professionalswith access to digital information on medications, diseases, and the recent research results. These products are searchable on tablets, smartphones, and computers. Most health science libraries provide access to at least one POC. A survey of 138 Medical Library Association members, however, shows that most librarians rarely mention or incorporate POCs into health science classes. In the Fall of 2017, after reviewing the results of a survey, librarians at the University of Toledo, incorporated POCs, patient cases, and group activities into classes taught to first-year medical students hoping to see changes in student practices.

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